Tempo Building

Location: McMinnville, OR
Completed: 1997

Project Highlights:

  • » Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc. represented the owner’s interests in negotiations with city departments and the State Historic Preservation Office over the course of the project.
  • » Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc. persuaded the owner to stabilize the brick exterior.
  • » Some building code updates were not required due to code negotiations and interpretations.
  • Tempo Building street facade after construction ~ Photo by Doreen L. Wynja

    images/CommHist/tb/1.jpg

    An historic commercial building remodel by Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc.
  • Tempo Building rear view after construction ~ Photo by Doreen L. Wynja

    images/CommHist/tb/2.jpg

    An historic commercial building remodel by Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc.
  • Tempo Building rear view during construction

    images/CommHist/tb/3.jpg

    Photo during construction of an historic commercial building remodel by Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc.
  • Tempo Building rear view, east side, during construction

    images/CommHist/tb/4.jpg

    Photo during construction of an historic commercial building remodel by Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc.
  • Tempo Building rear view before construction

    images/CommHist/tb/5.jpg

    Photo during construction of an historic commercial building remodel by Marcia A. Mikesh Architect Inc.

The Tempo Building faces the main downtown street in the McMinnville Downtown Historical District. This two story building has 9000 square feet on each floor. Retail, small restaurants, and offices are on the main level. The upper floor was converted to a single family residence. The utility basement was closed off from tenant use to avoid adding a fire sprinkler system. Historic designation required coordination with SHPO and the city planning department for work on the front and rear façades.

The rear of the building was altered to include new storefront entrances for several small tenant spaces and removal of decrepit structures. This required installing completely new electrical services for tenants, tuck-point existing brick masonry, and replacement of the original severely degraded wood-framed windows. With a limited budget and the expanding scope of work common in older buildings, the owners wanted to limit work on the south façade, but the brick masonry mortar was badly eroded overall and poorly patched in several areas. The architect persuaded them to stabilize the exposed masonry through tuck-pointing.

Architectural services were limited to building and site drawings, code analysis and meetings with jurisdiction, and consultation on construction changes. The second floor apartment interior design and finish was completed by others.